Laptop cover: Sew Selfless September

7 Oct

This is the last of my SSS items! I didn’t actually finish it in September, but that is due to a combination of: making the beanbag cover from my last post when I should have been doing this, then being ill, then my sewing machine going haywire after I’d only sewn about a quarter of it. Anyway, my sewing machine perked up again on Sunday so I decided to finish it and hope that it could still count.

Sew Selfless September_bigger

Click to go through to Sometimes Sewist’s SSS intro

My boyfriend has decided to replace his 8-year old laptop (surprisingly) with a shiny new, fast, smaller one since he is starting his PhD. He got a MacBook Pro 13″ (normal, not air). Ages ago he chose this zig-zag fabric without us knowing what to do with it, and when he got the MacBook I hoped that the single fat quarter which we bought would be enough for – and it turns out that it definitely is!

I decided to opt for an envelope-style, as he wanted it to be waterproof and I felt that needed something which was covered on all six sides. So this needed a FQ of outside fabric, a FQ of batting (I used quilting cotton batting), and a FQ of waterproof fabric (mine was navy nylon).

Laptopcase_bottom

Here’s the stripes all lining up next to the flap:

Laptopcase_tom

And a close-up of the binding which I used to close the edge where the case opens to let the laptop in/out – it is not perfect by any means and I think the envelope style makes it a little harder to have neat edges – I wonder if somehow a zipped-up case might have actually made it easier to have all the raw edges enclosed and everything a bit neater? Anyway, I made my own bias binding for the first time! It was only about 25cm worth but still.

Laptopcase_binding1Laptopcase_binding2

I haven’t written out all of my instructions but I kept all of my measurements and doodles, so feel free to ask, though there’s so many out there already that unless you are as fussy as me I am sure you can find what you want.

He is really happy with it and it kept his laptop dry when he and the contents of his bag got quite wet during a cycle in the rain (yay British autumn) so it serves its purpose!

I didn’t have any sew-on Velcro and my metal snappers/fasteners risk scratching his laptop so it doesn’t fasten for now, but the flap is just long enough to get away with that until I can get to Hobbycraft / John Lewis.

If that is allowed to count in my Sew Selfless September, then I managed to complete my task successfully! Though if it doesn’t I don’t mind much, as I was able to make plenty of things for people and three people have benefitted well from it :)

Beanbag cover (Sew Selfless September)

5 Oct

I did make this over a week ago, in September, but I have been far too busy to post it!

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My sister left for uni last Saturday!  She asked me to make her a new beanbag cover since the previous one was a bit childish…

We don’t have many fabric shops around here, and I didn’t have time to order from eBay before she left, so I got her to go to a local shop and buy a cheap duvet cover.  £8 for a double duvet set! So much fabric.

I used the old one to slightly work out what to do and saw that it had a circular base of 18″ diameter. I wanted the new cover to be slightly smaller  so I decided to make my circle base 18″ before seams so 16″ after.
I didn’t want to have to put in a zip or some type of fastening especially when the duvet has one,  so I drew a semi circle with the straight edge a cm away from the snap fasteners / poppers at the bottom of the duvet cover.

Beanbag_basemeasuring

Beanbag_base1

Then I cut a piece the rest of the length of the fabric (about 60″) and 26″wide. I left I the extra few inches of length on (you need the perimeter of the circle, so 3.14*diameter plus seam allowance plus a few extra inches to account for issues caused by attaching a straight line to a curve)

(I didn’t take any pictures of the next few steps – I hope they are clear if anyone is following them but I’m not trying to sell this as a tutorial…)

I then sewed the base to the rectangular piece I just cut, with the perimeter of the base being attached to the longer edge of the rectangle. I only pinned the start then kept adjusting the fabric as I went.  I sewed french seams for the base but not for the other seams as I realised it was incredibly pointless and was making the calculations a bit more tricky.

Now that I had the base attached to the main body of the bean bag, I sewed up the side seam (where the two ends of the rectangle meet. Next I laid it flat on the floor and measured the width of the beanbag – it was 28″ folded over so 56″ overall. I sewed four darts 7″ inch deep and 6″ wide, to taper the sides out into leaving just a few inches at the top for me to insert a handle into.

For the handle I sewed a 9″ wide strip of fabric together inside out, turned it right side out, and inserted it into that gap left at the top of the beanbag.

Here it is in situ:

Beanbag in sister's room

This did come under my Sew Selfless September pledge but I still had to make something for my boyfriend since my pledge specifically stated that I would. I had a few problems with the sewing machine, and with maths and visualising it, however it is done and I will post it soon :)

Sew Selfless September: A sewing kit

14 Sep

My sister leaves in two weeks for university, and doesn’t have anything resembling a sewing kit. Not even some black/white thread and a needle. She can definitely hand sew to mend her clothes as she sometimes borrows my stuff to do so. It is also her birthday today, which is a perfect coincidence. I decided to make her a hand-picked sewing kit. I used Truly Myrtle’s Box Bag Tutorial, which I should say upfront was really excellent. It is quite a tricky process (for me as a beginner) and you have to look at the pictures carefully to make sure that you understand as you go along, but it works really well and I was so pleased with the result. I’ll definitely be making another sometime, maybe for my cross-stitch stuff. I was originally going to make the one which I mentioned in this post, however I feel that the box bag offers more opportunity for expansion, and I am hoping that this will be the main kit she uses – the one in that link would be better suited to a travel version. 20140914 Sewing kit_equipment I wanted my bag to be the same dimension as that in the tutorial, so I used:

  • Two pieces of fabric 13.5″x17″ (from fat quarters)
  • Two pieces of interfacing 13″x16.5″ (one heavy, one light)
  • One 14″ white YK zip
  • Scissors, pins, zipper foot, ruler, rotary cutter, cutting mat, white thread, and my SEAM RIPPER

20140914 Sewing kit_closed bag 3 It is not symmetrical as you can see there, however I take comfort in that the line is at least straight so it is ok for it to be off-centre. 20140914 Sewing kit_bag contents 2 I hand-sewed on this ribbon that I got from eBay (only half of those red stitches are mine) You’ll notice that I left off the handle. By that point of the tutorial I had found it so hard (I am a little ill and it was 2am, my fault not that of the tutorial!) that I was convinced that it would be a royal mess when I turned it out, so chose not to add the handle. I regret not adding the handle, as it was one of two really good things about this tutorial (the other being that it is lined and seamless) and I think it would have looked nicer than I thought in my tired state. 20140914 Sewing kit_bag contens full It contains:

  • 6 spools of thread (black, white, red, beige, blue, brass)
  • two needle threaders
  • a thimble
  • safety pins in 4 sizes (36)
  • sew-on snappers (helpful for gaping tops/dresses!)
  • a dressmakers’ measuring tape
  • hemming web
  • a seam ripper
  • 24 needles in a felted needle book which matches the box bag!
  • some nice sewing scissors which my mum has bought her separately

I made the needle book quite quickly out of some scrap fabric – I had been planning to make this really awesome one from Diary of a Crafty Lady, but again was a bit tired and couldn’t face it, but I wouldn’t have had enough matching fabric for it anyway. Maybe I’ll buy a pretty fabric and make her one for Christmas and she can use this one for her pins? 20140914 Sewing kit_needle book closed 20140914 Sewing kit_needle book p1 20140914 Sewing kit_needle book p2 The needle book took about 10 minutes to make and just uses two bits of felt and two bits of fabric. I bought the ‘hook and loop’ (John Lewis brand instead of Velcro) and didn’t realise it was adhesive until I went to use it. I also didn’t realise that you can’t sew through adhesive hook and loop (unless it is the special ‘stick and sew’ kind) until my needle got stuck and subsequently broke. Oops. It was a really simple process. Sew two rectangles of fabric together right sides together, with a small seam allowance all around, leaving an inch un-sewn to turn it right side out. Turn it right side out, iron it, and top stitch around the edges. Sew the two pieces of felt onto the book with a line completely down the centre of the fabric and felt, and iron it folded so that it holds that shape easier. Attach two pieces of hook and loop, and it’s done!

20140914 Sewing kit_maythethoughts

I am giving it to her alongside my favourite book, a collection from a London artist from http://www.maythethoughtsbewithyou.com (a personalised signed copy!)

With this post I am two-thirds of my way through my Sew Selfless September pledge. Jess of the Sometimes Sewist  set up Sew Selfless September to encourage us all to sew for others this month. I pledged to make items for three people: my sister-in-law (posted here), my sister (this post), and my boyfriend (which won’t be easy, but I have some ideas – watch this space).

Sew Selfless September: a pillowcase and an eye mask

6 Sep

Sew Selfless September_bigger

This is my first Sew Selfless September post (see my pledge here), and I’ve made two items! It has been a bit hectic this week so I am posting them together :)

It was my sister-in-law’s birthday this week. She had asked me to make a baby pillowcase, and I had some fabric leftover from the baby quilt which I’d been (secretly) making. The pieces of fabric that I had were perhaps an inch or so too small, so it didn’t fit perfectly, but I am happy with it (the closest I have ever got a line of stitching to the zip – unfortunately no close-ups)

Baby_pillowcase_front

baby_pillowcase_back

The back – excuse the poor lighting/angle/background

And it matches the quilt, so I gave them to her together:

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I was so happy about the zip that I couldn’t face ripping it out when I realised that I’d sewn it in upside down. I wanted the zip pull to be at the TOP of the pillow when closed so it’d be away from the baby’s face. I have several potential solutions: cover it in ribbon/soft stuff; use the pillow upside down; or cut off the zipper pull and attach ribbon or some other soft thing. Hmmm.

Another snag about the zip: I didn’t really think about merging it in. I normally insert zips like in this coin purse, so didn’t really think about the zip being in a corner. I’d appreciate any tutorial recommendations / tips!

 

My SECOND make this week, and one that took about half an hour without a pattern, is an eye mask also for my sister-in-law.

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20140903_EyeMask_back

I used some of the fabric which I used for her Christmas presents, and bought some purple lingerie elastic as I didn’t know how big her head is and it has plenty of give, is pretty, and comfy! I decided to use two straps, as that is what I have on the shop-bought eye mask which I have, and it is MUCH better than having just one strap – highly recommended.

I used a fleecy material for the back, which is so comfy. I wonder if I should have used interfacing – though as I had half an hour to make and wrap this I didn’t have time to find and cut some once I realised!

Even though I made two items, I am still only really a third of the way through my pledge, as I pledged to make items for three separate people – I’m hoping to get some time today to make my sister’s birthday present….

 

Baby quilt: completed and gifted!

5 Sep

I have finally finished the baby quilt which I have spent LOADS of time making for my baby neice-or-nephew who is due in the next couple of weeks!

It is only a small (cot-sized) quilt, but it has been quite a big task for me – well lots of little ones which started around March

  • Find gender-neutral fabric to suit their chosen baby room theme (I went for this)
  • Work out what style / arrangement would suit the fabric (I went for one from Oh, Fransson!)
  • Decide what to use as the backing, and whether to use batting/wadding (frantic post here)
  • Buy new sewing equipment, including: walking foot, rotary cutter, cutting mat (excitement here)
  • Sew the squares and strips together (here) and work out how on earth to install a walking foot to quilt it (here)

Finally, the last stage was to use bias binding to finish it off – which I did this week. I decided to follow the advice on my previous posts (those in the last bullet point above) and only machine stitch one side of the binding. I think that was sensible and I am much happier with the result than I’d have been with messy machine stitches – even though the binding seems to have puckered the whole way around I tried everything to stop it (I even basted it). I gave it to the mum-to-be earlier this week and she was really happy with it :)

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Click to enlarge

I used the Charm Squares Quilt tutorial from Oh, Fransson! which is a really nice design as it avoids teddy print overload.

As you can probably tell from the massive number of links to other posts/blogs, I have had SO much help from the blogging/online sewing world in making this quilt, and while it is not perfect I think that it is SO much better than it would have been had I just ebayed some fabric, found a pattern and flown with it. It feels very bragging/uppity but thank you to everyone who commented or even happened to have something on their blog which helped me – if I liked your quilt/binding post it was probably helping me get through this quilt!

I really enjoyed doing it, and would be keen to try another sometime, though I have two questions – I’d be so grateful for any help with either of them:

  1. are people generally able to quilt with a normal sewing machine? I had ok space with this with my Singer Tradition, but I was only using one layer of cotton with one layer of fleece. I’m worried a double quilt would get to be too much to fit under the arm of the sewing machine?
  2. How do I stop that puckering?? I had it flat when I was basting it :( 

I have 100 followers!! Thank you!!

26 Aug

I am just a bit excited that as of today I have 100 followers!

I really enjoy sewing, and a lot of that enjoyment is in finding ideas and inspiration from people on here, and also getting feedback or help on my projects.

When I recently tried to show a friend a couple of things I’ve made her response was “So what? Do you want me to show you [list of things she made in textiles at school]?” – which is the complete opposite of the sort of response anyone receives in the blogging world (and I’d honestly have loved to see all of the things she made!).

I know what I  make is not perfect (and is never original), and 99%+ of people who read my posts can do better – but I’ve never had a single negative comment or seen them on other people’s blogs. I started this blog to keep a record of what I’ve done as I struggle (and hopefully improve) at sewing, but it has become much more a part of my sewing process, and blogging is now a big part of my sewing. I don’t sew anything without blogging it anymore! The first time – repeats of items haven’t been posted yet though I imagine when I move onto more difficult projects they might.

This is just a quick ramble trying to say thank you, for all being so nice and talented (and nice enough to share your talent).

Have a lovely week :)

 

Up next – I am hoping to finish the baby quilt this week, make a baby pillow cover, and then comes Sew Selfless September which will hopefully contain: a wheat/rice bag, a sewing bag, a needle book, an eye mask, and a drawstring pouch. I’ve never made that many things in a month before!!

Fabric corkboard/pinboard – de-uglifying a university bedroom

24 Aug

An alternative use for fabric, other than sewing….

I changed rooms halfway through my final year of university, and found myself in a room with a huge (useful) but disgusting yellow corkboard. Armed with some cheap polycotton and a tub of simple drawing pins, I covered that ugly board and turned it into something of a feature in my room. I couldn’t bear to pull it down when I left – I wonder if it is still up, two years (and two new tenants) later! I’ve now passed this tip onto my sister who starts University in just over a month, even if her board isn’t as ugly as mine was it will still be a cheap way to make her room much prettier! :)

Uni fabric corkboard